CAT Vehicle 2015

TUCSON, Arizona -- Visiting undergraduate students, including some who are the first in their families to attend college, experienced hands-on research---and hands-off driving---in a National Science Foundation program at the University of Arizona this summer. They will demonstrate their driverless tech research projects on the UA campus Aug. 11.

CAT Vehicle under autonomous control. Image credit: University of Arizona.

Sterling Holcomb, Audrey Knowlton, and Juan Guerra published results of their research project in WinnComm'16, the Wireless Innovation Forum Conference on Wireless Communications Technologies and Software Defined Radio, in Reston, VA. Their paper, titled "Power Efficient Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks" was a new approach for Vehicular AdHoc Networks (VANETS) that represents a significant reduction in power use. This benefit enables more vehicles to communicate simultaneously. The paper was presented in the technical track, "Top 10 Most Wanted Wireless Innovations."

Yegeta Zeleke and Kennon McKeever published results of their research project in the 15th Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, which is the longest-running workshop in the history of SPLASH/OOPSLA. Their paper, titled "Experience Report: Constraint-based Modeling of Autonomous Vehicle Trajectories" focused on enabling young students (e.g., in elementary school) to safely control a dangerous robot, such as autonomous car, through the application of constraint-based checks during the code generation process.

Charles Jawny worked on developing hybrid predictive controller technology, which helps the vehicle identify obstacles in the environment without compromising velocity.

Alberto Heras (University of Arizona)
Lykes Claytor (Wofford College)

Can we route traffic better than traffic lights can, if cars can communicate with one another?

Elizabeth Olson worked on developing code that controls the CAT vehicle through a smart phone.

Yegeta Zeleke worked on creating a new programming language that allows for faster programming of autonomous vehicles.

Ryan Summit researched ways a driverless car can function in stop-and-go traffic with inexpensive technology, such as with the use of low-cost cameras.

Yesenia Velasco worked on developing hybrid predictive controller technology, which helps the vehicle identify obstacles in the environment without compromising velocity.

Sterling Holcomb worked to improve vehicle-to-vehicle communications while reducing power consumption of communications systems.

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