Sterling Holcomb, Audrey Knowlton, and Juan Guerra published results of their research project in WinnComm'16, the Wireless Innovation Forum Conference on Wireless Communications Technologies and Software Defined Radio, in Reston, VA. Their paper, titled "Power Efficient Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks" was a new approach for Vehicular AdHoc Networks (VANETS) that represents a significant reduction in power use. This benefit enables more vehicles to communicate simultaneously. The paper was presented in the technical track, "Top 10 Most Wanted Wireless Innovations."

Yegeta Zeleke and Kennon McKeever published results of their research project in the 15th Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, which is the longest-running workshop in the history of SPLASH/OOPSLA. Their paper, titled "Experience Report: Constraint-based Modeling of Autonomous Vehicle Trajectories" focused on enabling young students (e.g., in elementary school) to safely control a dangerous robot, such as autonomous car, through the application of constraint-based checks during the code generation process.

Hands off the wheel, please.

Kennon McKeever, 20, a junior at the University of Arizona, uses Meta GME, a computer program, to tell the UA’s Cognitive and Autonomous Test, or CAT, vehicle where to drive. A dozen visiting and Tucson college students were chosen to participate in the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. The students researched and developed apps to remotely operate the CAT vehicle in a parking lot Tuesday, Aug 11, 2016.

TUCSON, Arizona -- Visiting undergraduate students, including some who are the first in their families to attend college, experienced hands-on research---and hands-off driving---in a National Science Foundation program at the University of Arizona this summer. They will demonstrate their driverless tech research projects on the UA campus Aug. 11.

CAT Vehicle under autonomous control. Image credit: University of Arizona.

Today's cars are getting more and more sophisticated in their behaviors, but true autonomy needs truly expensive sensors. Carlos Asuncion of UC Berkeley participated in the CAT Vehicle program in 2014, and he was interviewed by Ted Simons for the Arizona Horizon program on PBS 8 (KAET) in Phoenix, AZ.

 To watch the entire interview, visit http://www.azpbs.org/arizonahorizon/detailvid.php?id=15095

Carlos Asuncion (2014 Participant) on Public Television

This research experience for undergraduates (REU) is engaged in the myriad of applications that are related to autonomous ground vehicles. This summer, 12 NSF-funded undergraduate students participated in an immersive research experience, sitting side-by-side with graduate researchers and working on one of the most compelling, and complex, applications of today: autonomous systems.

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Apply

The applications process is currently closed for 2016. We typically accept applications from mid-December until early April, for a June-August program. Check back during that time frame in order to apply for the 2017 program.

  • 1 March: Applications due, to guarantee full consideration
  • 8 March: Letters of Recommendation due, to guarantee full consideration
  • 9-23 March: Selection process
  • 15 April: Notification deadline
  • April-May: Preparation and background reading
  • June-August: 10-week program.

This REU site will support 10 students over the summer. Each student will receive:

  • Stipend of $5,000 over the summer
  • Housing, meal allowance, and $600 travel allowance to Tucson, AZ
  • Letters of recommendation from their faculty mentors

Students will participate as researchers for the summer, working side by side with graduate researchers and faculty who are experts in cognitive radio and autonomous ground vehicles. Want to know more about what the REU is like? Check out the videos made by previous CAT Vehicle participants.

Whether for business or pleasure, people come from all across the world to visit Tucson's blossoming green landscape. Found in the Sonoran Desert - dubbed "the greenest of deserts" - Tucson offers travelers clear skies, fresh air, stunning sunsets and rugged outdoor adventures.

CAT Vehicle 2015

Sterling Holcomb, Audrey Knowlton, and Juan Guerra published results of their research project in WinnComm'16, the Wireless Innovation Forum Conference on Wireless Communications Technologies and Software Defined Radio, in Reston, VA. Their paper, titled "Power Efficient Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks" was a new approach for Vehicular AdHoc Networks (VANETS) that represents a significant reduction in power use. This benefit enables more vehicles to communicate simultaneously. The paper was presented in the technical track, "Top 10 Most Wanted Wireless Innovations."

Yegeta Zeleke and Kennon McKeever published results of their research project in the 15th Workshop on Domain-Specific Modeling, which is the longest-running workshop in the history of SPLASH/OOPSLA. Their paper, titled "Experience Report: Constraint-based Modeling of Autonomous Vehicle Trajectories" focused on enabling young students (e.g., in elementary school) to safely control a dangerous robot, such as autonomous car, through the application of constraint-based checks during the code generation process.

Charles Jawny worked on developing hybrid predictive controller technology, which helps the vehicle identify obstacles in the environment without compromising velocity.

TUCSON, Arizona -- Visiting undergraduate students, including some who are the first in their families to attend college, experienced hands-on research---and hands-off driving---in a National Science Foundation program at the University of Arizona this summer. They will demonstrate their driverless tech research projects on the UA campus Aug. 11.

CAT Vehicle under autonomous control. Image credit: University of Arizona.

Alberto Heras (University of Arizona)
Lykes Claytor (Wofford College)

Can we route traffic better than traffic lights can, if cars can communicate with one another?

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